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Friday, April 19 2019 @ 02:39 PM UTC

Coral reef growth linked to air pollution: study

Environmental Issues A research team linked airborne particles caused by volcanic activity and air pollution to episodes of slow coral-reef growth.

Like tree rings, long-lived coral skeletons preserve a record of coral growth. Previously, scientists linked coral-growth patterns in the Caribbean to a phenomenon called the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation—fluctuations in sea-surface temperatures and incoming sunlight.

In order to better predict the effects of climate change and human disturbance on reefs, Lester Kwiatkowski, University of Exeter, and researchers from the University of Queensland, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization and STRI analyzed coral-growth records from Belize and Panama spanning the period from 1880 to 2000. An Earth-system model simulation told them how well sea-surface temperature, short-wave radiation and aragonite-saturation state, a measure of ocean acidification, predicted changes in coral growth.

Their data came from several coral cores drilled in reefs near the Atlantic entrance of the Panama Canal formed by the coral species Siderastrea siderea between 1880 and 1989, whereas samples from the Turneffe atoll in Belize showed growth fluctuations in the coral species Montastrea faveolata from 1905 to 1998.

Particles from air pollution, primarily sulfate, reflect incoming sunlight and make clouds brighter reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the sea surface. Coral growth corresponded closely to sea surface temperatures and light levels. Growth fluctuations in the late 19th and early 20th centuries were largely driven by volcanic activity.

Researchers explain a dive in surface temperatures and coral growth in the 1960s by increased air pollution associated with post-World War II industrial expansion in North America and to a lesser extent in Central and South America.

The influence of human aerosol emissions was more pronounced in coral cores from Belize, perhaps because Belize is closer to sources of industrial emissions. Fluctuations unexplained by the model, especially in the growth records from Panama, probably result from runoff from deforestation and from the construction of the Panama Canal waterway.

"The coral growth chronology for Panama allowed us to identify the effects of human interventions at the beginning of 1900s, but the decline in growth observed by the middle of the 20th century corresponding to the beginnings of the industrial era in coastal Panama remained unresolved by the model," said Héctor Guzmán, staff scientist from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute who participated in the study.

"Our study suggests that coral ecosystems are likely to be sensitive to not only future global atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration but also to regional aerosol emissions associated with industrialization and decarbonization," added Kwiatkowski. (fis.com)

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Coral reef growth linked to air pollution: study | 2 comments | Create New Account
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Coral reef growth linked to air pollution: study
Authored by: ChiefEngineer on Wednesday, April 10 2013 @ 07:19 PM UTC

News for morons: Wired magazine bleats that "high levels of CO2 could reduce coral reefs". However, inconveniently, Corals evolved during the Cambrian Era, when CO2 levels were eight to twenty times higher than today. The great coral reefs of the Permian era formed when CO2 was as high as 3,000 ppm CO2.

Obviously corals like high levels of CO2.

You see, folks, government funded research or that funded from Progressive fever swamp NGOs is worth a bucketful of day old fish guts.

Coral reef growth linked to air pollution: study
Authored by: Arcuni on Sunday, April 14 2013 @ 12:06 AM UTC

All I know is that the Gulf of Cheriqui Has been very warm with sea surface temperatures last month between 86 and 89 degrees Fahrenheit. The fish are staying deep and will not rise to trolled lures. Bummer! In the meantime the waters of the Azuro Peninsula have been between 75 and 80 and the fishing has been great, especially for yellow fin tuna. I can't wait for the Gulf waters to cool, and they are going down gradually.