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Tuesday, November 20 2018 @ 02:22 PM UTC

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NATO chief fears Arctic division

Canal Daily OperationBy Randy Boswell, Canwest News Service - The head of NATO has cautioned the alliance's Arctic nations -- including Canada and the U.S. -- to stay united despite the growing potential for conflicts among NATO members over energy resources and shipping rights in the increasingly open waters surrounding the North Pole. "Responding to the changing environment, several Arctic Rim countries are strengthening their capabilities, and military activity in the High North has been steadily increasing," NATO secretary general Jaap de Hoop Scheffer told alliance officials attending a meeting in Iceland about the rapidly shifting geopolitics of the Arctic. "Although the long-term implications of climate change and the retreating ice cap in the Arctic are still unclear, what is very clear is that the High North is going to require even more of the alliance's attention in the coming years." (more)
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Panama Canal - the world's best shortcut

Canal Daily Operation By SHANEY HUDSON - Sun-Herald - My first glimpse was from above. We flew down the continental divide, banking left to reveal the Caribbean Coast, before the plane turned right towards the sprawling metropolis of Panama City. Container ships dotted the bay like rectangular polka dots. And that thin, dark zigzag cutting the country in two, joining the Atlantic with the Pacific, was the Panama Canal. Not only did the canal revolutionise shipping, its construction was a drama of epic proportions involving countries, personalities, war and the death of about 25,000 workers. I'd assumed the only way to navigate the canal was either as cargo crew or by booking a passage on a luxury cruise. However, an affordable alternative is a four-hour partial transit on the Pacific Queen, a 35-metre cruiser custom-built for day trips with lunch, drinks and a guide on hand. (more)
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Shipping industry prepares for economic turnaround

Canal Daily OperationTampa Bay Business Journal - by Larry Halstead Staff writer - There were no Pollyanna words of encouragement for shipping in 2009 at an American Association of Port Authorities conference Thursday. Richard Wainio, Tampa port director, said 2009 is going to be “a very difficult year.” James Brennan, partner with Norbridge Inc., a Concord, Mass.-based management consulting firm for the transportation and logistics industries, echoed that assessment. Brennan spoke to more than 100 shipping industry executives, representing ports and vendors around the world, at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Tampa. Even with potential bailout money, there would be a lag of perhaps 18 months before any shipping industry infrastructure projects could be completed and provide benefits for the economy. Manufacturing inventories have risen since 2002 and any economic recovery would have to be predicated on companies working off those excess inventories, Brennan said. Brennan predicted it would be the first half of 2011 before the economy returns to normal, although it should begin to turn around in 2010. (more)
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Sector Snap: Drybulk shippers soar as rates rise

Canal Daily OperationNEW YORK (AP) -- Drybulk shipping stocks leaped Friday as the rates for the biggest drybulk vessels on the seas hit their highest point since October. Capesize vessel rates jumped 20 percent Friday, Dahlman Rose analyst Omar Notka said, as excess vessels supply continues to shrink, driving up prices for remaining vessels. The cost to charter a Capesize vessel has leaped nearly 50 percent in the last week, he said. Capesize vessels are so named because they are too big to fit through the Panama or Suez Canals and must instead navigate around the Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn to travel between oceans. "Other sectors of the market are more muted, but Capesize momentum is carrying through to some extent," he said. Two out of three other vessel classes posted minimal gains on Friday. Also Friday, Lazard Capital Markets shipping and logistics analyst Urs Dur raised his price target on drybulk company Diana Shipping Inc. to $17 from $14 and reiterated his "Buy" rating, suggesting the company is low-risk compared with its peers. In afternoon trading, Diana Shipping rose 77 cents, or 5.5 percent, to $14.91. DryShips Inc. gained $1.94, or 12.8 percent, to $17.07 and Danaos Corp. added 75 cents, or 7.9 percent, to $10.21.
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Shipping hit by global downturn

Canal Daily OperationBy Barry Turnbull, Liverpool Daily Post - Shipping lines and major ports like Liverpool are having to rethink their futures in the face of the credit crunch. The international shipping trade has been hit by the global economic slowdown that looks set to have a knock-on effect on the Port of Liverpool. Container traffic, in particular, is sharply down, which may have repercussions for Peel Ports’ plan for a £100m post-Panamax container terminal at Seaforth. Peel says it will take account of economic and financial conditions when it makes a final decision about the in-river engineering project in May. The company has obtained a Harbour Revision Order to enable the work to go ahead if the plan proves viable. Frank Robotham, Peel Ports marketing manager, said: “We are still doing detailed work on the engineering and costings, which won't be finished till next May. It is only then that we will look at the total costs and take a view on timescales. (more)
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Panama Canal protected by detection tech

Canal Daily Operation COLON, Panama, Dec. 31 (UPI) -- New nuclear threat detection technologies are currently operating in Panama after a recent agreement with the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration. The United States and Panama recently reached an agreement that paved the way for the NNSA, in partnership with the Manzanillo International Terminal and others, to install advanced radiation detection systems at the Panama Canal's Atlantic and Pacific Ocean megaports, the NNSA reported. The ports, located at Colon and Panama City, are currently operating the scanning technologies to prevent the smuggling of illicit nuclear materials in cargo containers, as part of the Container Security Initiative. "We are working closely with the Panamanian National Customs Authority and with the private terminal operators in Panama to prevent nuclear terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction," William Tobey, NNSA deputy administrator for defense nuclear non-proliferation, said in a statement. "The success of this project reflects a strong commitment and desire on behalf of the government of Panama to secure its ports from illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials."
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Panama Canal Maintenance Work Restricts Traffic

Canal Daily Operation

By DON WINNER for Panama-Guide.com - According to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), beginning Sunday, December 14, 2008, at 2000 hours through Friday, December 19, 2008, at 0400 hours, the east sidewall culvert of Gatun Locks will be out of service for the rehabilitation of three (3) rising stem valves. Although both lanes will remain in service, they will be served by single culverts during filling and spilling operations. Therefore, all lockages at Gatun Locks will consume more time than normal. As a result, "Condition 1.a" will be in effect from December 15, 2008 through December 18, 2008. In layman's terms, there are some slight restrictions in effect for the next few days. The Panama Canal regularly runs at or near peak capacity, and any "clogging of the arteries" so to speak generally translates into more ships waiting in the anchorages, and more total "canal waters" time for ships passing through. More demand than supply - that's generally a good thing. The Panama Canal generates a huge amount of money for the country of Panama every year. Because of this asset and with the expanded canal due to come on line in 2014, eventually Panama will become the richest country in Latin America. Just wait and see...

Copyright 2008 by Don Winner for Panama-Guide.com. Go ahead and use whatever you like as long as you credit the source. Salud.

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Panama: Canal open to Russian warships

Canal Daily Operationiht.com PANAMA CITY, Panama: Panama said its canal is open to all, including a Russian warship sailing through the transoceanic waterway on Friday. The destroyer Admiral Chabanenko is the first Soviet or Russian military ship to traverse the 50-mile (80-kilometer) waterway since World War II. The U.S. government has shown little concern about the destroyer's trip through a canal that was off limits to the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The destroyer's journey to the Western Hemisphere, however, reflects Russia's growing influence and anger with the U.S. for using warships to deliver aid to Georgia after its August war with Russia. Panamanian Foreign Minister Samuel Lewis portrayed the Russian canal crossing as business as usual. (more)
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ACP Announces 2008 Metrics

Canal Daily OperationPANAMA CITY, Panama, October 24, 2008 – The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) announced its operational metrics for the 2008 fiscal year (FY 08) today. Year-end (October 2007 – September 2008) statistics reveal a marginal decline in total transits and tonnage when compared to FY 07. However, the Canal also experienced growth in core segments, most notably tanker and passenger transits. Total Canal transits remained fairly constant, with a slight decline of 0.1 percent – from 14,721 to 14,702 transits. Booked transits (excluding auctioned slots) increased 3.9 percent – from 7,857 to 8,167 transits. Panama Canal/Universal Measurement System (PC/UMS) tonnage decreased 1.1 percent – from 312.9 million PC/UMS tons to 309.6 million PC/UMS tons. (more)
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Panama Canal Earns More Than $2 Billion in FY 2008

Canal Daily Operation By Wilfredo Jordán Serrano for La Prensa - The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) took in just over $2 billion dollars during fiscal year 2008 which concluded on 30 September. ACP Administrator Alberto Alemán Zubieta said that for the first time the Panama Canal surpassed $2 billion dollars of total income. The increases in income are attributed to increases in tolls applied by the ACP, and income was up even though fiscal year closed with 19 fewer transits than 2007 due to the financial crisis in the United States. (See Comments)
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Panama Canal Continues Full Steam Ahead

Canal Daily OperationMaritime Global Net - PANAMA CITY, Panama, September 22, 2008 – Every year, approximately five percent of the world’s trade transits the Panama Canal and by 2010, the waterway expects that it will celebrate its one-millionth transit. Through continued modernization efforts, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) has improved its services and increased capacity including the replacement of 50,000 feet of tow track, the integration of more powerful locomotives and an increase in its tugboat fleet. The tow tracks enable locomotive units, or "mules" as they are called, to move alongside transiting vessels, affixed by wire cables, to maintain a ship's position during passage through Canal locks. Replacing the tracks, therefore, increases the efficiency of transits at the Canal. The waterway operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and since 1914, more than 8 billion long tons have crossed the Canal with a total of more than 957,600 transits. With service to more than 144 transportation routes across the globe, the Panama Canal continues to provide safe, reliable and efficient passage for all vessels.
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Repairs limit vessel transits of Panama Canal

Canal Daily OperationThe JOURNAL of COMMERCE ONLINE - The Panama Canal Authority announced restricted transits Sept. 18-24 due to repairs to the west sidewall culvert of Miraflores Locks that began Tuesday. No more than eight "supers" may be booked for southbound transit and of these, no more than six with “full daylight-hour” restriction. Similarly, no more than seven supers may be booked for transit in the northbound direction, and of these, no more than five with “full daylight-hour” restriction. The total number of “full daylight-hour” restricted supers is limited to eight vessels per day. No more than four regular vessels may be booked for transit in the same direction. Of the six slots available for regular vessels, no more than two may be allocated to regular vessels transiting under restrictions.
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Panama Canal's 2008 Cargo Won't Grow as U.S. Slows, Chief Says

Canal Daily OperationBy Eric Sabo and Karla Palomo Sept. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Panama Canal traffic probably won't grow this year for the first time since 2002 as the slowing U.S. economy damps demand for imports, the waterway's operator said. Freight shipped in 2008 will total 312 million tons, the same amount transported last year, Panama Canal Authority Chief Executive Officer Alberto Aleman said yesterday in a Bloomberg Television interview. ``We are going to end the year flat,'' Aleman said. Aleman's traffic projection reflects the U.S.'s status as the largest customer for the waterway, 9 years after handing over the canal authority to Panama. China is the canal's No. 2 user, the authority has said. (more)
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Panama Canal Renews Alliance With Georgia Ports Authority

Canal Daily OperationBy Trevor Williams for Global Atlanta.com - The Panama Canal Authority on Sept. 9 moved to renew its strategic partnership with the Georgia Ports Authority for three more years. The two entities first signed a memorandum of understanding in June 2003 to conduct joint marketing efforts and share data, expansion plans, training and technology. “This partnership is an important link for future growth, opening doors for new business opportunities and providing sustainable economic solutions for Panama and Georgia,” said Alberto Alemán Zubieta, the canal authority’s CEO. As Georgia’s trade with Asia increases, the relationship between the Panama Canal and the Port of Savannah has grown in importance. The canal provides the shortest transit for East Asian shippers to the U.S. East Coast. (more)
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ACP Receives Credit Rating from Moody's

Canal Daily OperationMaritime Global Net - PANAMA CITY, Panama, September 10, 2008 – For the first time ever, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) received an investment grade rating from one of the world’s top credit rating agencies. Moody’s Investors Services today issued the ACP an A2 credit rating. This “A” rating classifies the ACP as “upper-medium grade and subject to low credit risk,” and reaffirms Panama’s growing presence in the global marketplace. “This announcement is a matter of national pride for Panama, because it is the result of the business model we use to manage the Canal to ensure its efficiency, safety and profitability,” said ACP Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta. “This also underscores the dynamic growth and development of Panama – its booming economy, combined with the ongoing historic Canal expansion project and the effective management of the Canal, all contributed to the high score the ACP received,” Mr. Alemán Zubieta added. Moody’s Investors Services is one of the leading independent companies in credit ranking and risk analysis. Its rankings are used by international investors to analyze the conditions of more than 100 countries, 12,000 companies and 29,000 public institutions.
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Repairs to Slow Panama Transits

Canal Daily OperationTraffic World Online - Transits through the east lane of the Panama Canal will take longer than normal Aug. 19-27 due to repairs that will put the east sidewall culvert of Miraflores Locks out of service. The Panama Canal Authority said lockages will take longer than normal since the lane will receive single culvert during the filling and spilling operation, due to the repair of six and replacement of six rising stem valves. Condition 1.a of the waterway's Transit Reservation System will be in effect during that time. No more than eight supers may be booked for transit in the southbound direction, and of these, no more than six with "full daylight-hour" restriction. (more)
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Happy Birthday, Panama Canal

Canal Daily OperationBy Johanna M. Camargo for La Estrella - Now 94 years after it's opening, the Panama Canal continues to be the "goose that lays the golden eggs" for the national economy, and throughout international channels its efficiency is recognized at all levels. The Panama Canal has contributed more than $3.2 billion dollars to the Panamanian National Treasury since it was turned over to Panamanian control on 31 December 1999. This total almost duplicates the amount the United States gave to Panama during the entire 85 years the Panama Canal was under US control - over $1.8 billion dollars. Today, Panama is prepared for a new challenge, the construction of a new third set of locks, that would allow larger "post-panamax" ships to transit the Panama Canal.
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The ACP's Budget for Next Year - More than $2 Billion Dollars

Canal Daily OperationLa Prensa - The budget for the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) for the fiscal year running from 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009 will be more than $2.1 billion dollars, according to a report published yesterday in the "Gaceta Oficial" or official newspaper, according to Law #50 of 21 July 2008. Within the ACP budget are $835 million dollars destined for the program to expand the Panama Canal. The ACP budget for the 2006-2007 fiscal year was about $1.5 billion, and for the 2007-2008 fiscal year period it rose to just over $2 billion dollars.
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Panama sees strong shipping container growth

Canal Daily OperationPANAMA CITY, June 18 (Reuters) - Panama expects its shipping container volumes to increase by around 10 percent next year despite the downturn in the U.S. economy, the country's maritime authority said on Wednesday. The authority sees Panama's ports handling 5.6 million 20-foot (6.1 meter) shipping containers in 2009, up from around 5 million this year and 4.1 million in 2007. Panama has seen shipping volumes nearly double since 2006 on increasing Chinese demand for raw materials as well as growing exports in finished goods from the world's most populous country. "Latin America faces a great challenge because maritime transportation is growing at an accelerated rate, and so we must create infrastructure that can meet existing demand," maritime authority chief Fernando Solorzano told an industry meeting in the Panamanian capital. Panama has earmarked around $1.6 billion for upgrading current facilities. China's state-owned shipping giant China Ocean Shipping, COSCO, has expressed interest in building a new mega-port at the Panama Canal's Pacific entrance. Panama handles around 40 percent of Latin America's containers via its U.S.-built, 50 mile (80-km) canal between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. (Reporting by Andrew Beatty; editing by Carol Bishopric)
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NEW ORLEANS RENEWS PANAMA CANAL ALLIANCE

Canal Daily OperationMaritime Global Net - AN alliance between the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) and the Port of New Orleans – which has recently adopted a 2020 growth Master Plan of $1.04 billion, partially driven by the Canal’s expansion – has been renewed in the belief it “will help spur investment, increase trade and promote the “All-Water-Route”...” During an official ceremony this week in Panama, ACP Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta reaffirmed the ACP’s commitment to mutual growth and cooperation with Port of New Orleans President and CEO Gary LaGrange and members of the Port’s Board of Commissioners, by renewing a Memorandum of Understanding. Renewable on a three-year basis, the agreement further enforces the strategic alliance between the two entities, which was first initiated in 2003. "Today’s renewal of the Memorandum of Understanding with the Port of New Orleans underscores our strong economic and commercial bonds. Our common vision informs our strategy and creates new value based on information sharing and collaboration. As we embark on the next phases of the Panama Canal expansion project, we remain committed to providing solutions to the long-term needs of the shipping and maritime community,” said Mr. Alemán Zubieta. Port of New Orleans Board of Commissioners Chairman Jim Campbell added, "Our continuing partnership with the Panama Canal Authority will allow us to provide shippers with an efficient and cost-effective transportation route."
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Port renewing endeavor with Panama Canal

Canal Daily OperationNEW ORLEANS (AP) - The Port of New Orleans has renewed a cooperative alliance to promote trade from Asia through the canal to ports on the Gulf of Mexico and East Coast. The deal was signed this week with the Panama Canal Authority. It renews an agreement first reached in 2003. In 2007, about 2.5 million tons of general cargo came to New Orleans through the canal. That's about a third of the port's general cargo total for the year. Currently, the canal is being expanded with a new set of locks and a new lane of traffic that will allow more vessels and longer, wider ships.
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Correction: Panama-Canal Record story

Canal Daily OperationPANAMA CITY, Panama (AP) - In a June 10 story about a canal fee, The Associated Press, relying on a statement from the Panama Canal Authority, erroneously reported that the Disney Cruise Line paid a record US$331,200 for one of its ships to pass through the canal. The authority now says it wrongly estimated the fees and that Disney paid US$283,400 for «Disney Magic» to cross on May 16, an amount that was not a record.
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Panama Canal transit times fall

Canal Daily OperationBy Michelle Wiese Bockmann for Lloyd's List - Transit times at the canal has drastically eased. A THREE-month period of chronic congestion at the Panama Canal has drastically eased, with the backlog of vessels waiting to transit now at 36. As well as cuts to the lengthy queues, which peaked at 130 vessels, local agents said delays had been cut to between 36 to 48 hours, after exceeding more than 10 days. The Panama Canal Authority has also reduced the time it takes to transit the 80-km-long canal, after times blew out to average 53 hours in March, and rose by a third for the first three months of the year. On Monday, the daily transit time was under 20 hours. (more)
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U.S. cruise ship pays record to cross Panama Canal

Canal Daily Operation By Andrew Beatty PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - A U.S.-owned cruise ship has paid a record $331,200 to cross the Panama Canal as vessels fight for space in the increasingly congested waterway, authorities said on Tuesday. The 964-foot (295-meter)-long Disney Magic, owned by a subsidiary of Walt Disney Co, broke the transit record on May 16, the Panama Canal Authority said. The ship sails out of Port Canaveral, Florida, and is registered in the Bahamas. Three container ships have also recently paid more than $313,000, the previous record price set in October 2007 by NCL Corp Ltd vessel Norwegian Pearl. NCL is an affiliate of Star Cruises Ltd. Non-reserved slots for crossing the canal are sold at auction to the highest bidder, with yachts, cruise liners and container vessels all competing for limited spaces on the 50-mile (80-km) waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. (more)
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Panama Canal Pilot's "Malicious Compliance" Strike Continues

Canal Daily Operation

By DON WINNER for Panama-Guide.com - The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) released their monthly report, Monthly Canal Operations Summary – MAY 2008 dated 6 June 2008. Interestingly, the ACP also issued a press release titled Panama Canal Authority Releases Fiscal Year 2008 Second Quarter Metrics. The ACP is in a hard spot - they have to find a way to explain away conflicting information, and the only possible way to do that is to hope that no one is paying close attention to the details. (more)

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Panama Canal Finally Clears Backlog - Returns to Normal Ops Mode

Canal Daily Operation

By DON WINNER for Panama-Guide.com - The non-declared and unofficial "malicious compliance" strike by the pilots of the Panama Canal started on 15 February 2008, and the effect of that action lasted until today, almost four months later. The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) today issued their Advisory to Shipping A-16: "Panama Canal Transit Reservation (Booking) System - Return to Normal Number of Booking Slots for Supers." In that advisory they state that "For the past several days, the vessel backlog has remained under 50, and the waiting time has decreased to less than two days." And, they announce the lifting of measures taken in March to reduce the backlog. (more)

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Panama Canal Use Falls 2% in Second Quarter, Authority Says

Canal Daily OperationBy Carlos Barletta May 19 (Bloomberg) -- Panama Canal ship traffic fell 2 percent during the fiscal second quarter, the agency that runs the 93-year-old waterway reported. Ship transits fell to 3,971 from 4,053, with a decrease of 2.6 percent in tonnage, in the three months through March, the Panama Canal Authority said today in an e-mailed statement. Passenger ship traffic rose 35 percent to 124. ``The slight drop in total transits and tonnage during the second quarter can be attributed in part to the slowdown in the U.S. economy,'' said Rodolfo Sabonge, the authority's vice president for research and market analysis. Passages by dry-bulk vessels rose 6.7 percent to 625, while related tonnage climbed 10 percent, the authority said. The average time it takes a vessel to go through the canal increased 33 percent to 36 hours, as a peak in seasonal arrivals coincided with maintenance of some locks, the authority said. The Panama Canal is currently undergoing a $5.2 billion expansion that will allow more transits and post-panamax ships to navigate through the passage that connects the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea.
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Seeing is Believing - Almost 60 Ships in Panama Canal Pacific Anchorage

Canal Daily Operation

By DON WINNER for Panama-Guide.com - As they say, seeing is believing. A picture is worth a thousand words. The "show me" state. On Wednesday, 14 May 2008, I had reason to be up in one of the penthouse apartments under construction at the end of Punta Pacifica. Great view - of the Pacific anchorage of the Panama Canal. The ships who want to go Northbound through the canal from the Pacific to the Atlantic have to stop here to wait until they have a slot. Taking advantage of the great view, I whipped out my camera and took a series high resolution photos of the Pacific anchorage - which I used to count the ships. Due to the ongoing "malicious compliance" strike by the Panama Canal pilots there are now at least 60 ships waiting to go through. The "work to rules" slowdown continues to have a significant effect on the efficiency of the Panama Canal. (more)

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PANAMA PILOTS “GO SLOW”

Canal Daily OperationMaritime Global Net - THE Panama Canal Authority has accepted that there may be a “few very isolated” incidents where pilots are taking action top slow down traffic in support of their union's negotiations for a new contract and pay increase. The ACP says the incidents are being investigated and that “necessary measures” will be taken. The Authority also accepts seasonal delays have been exacerbated by maintenance work at two locks which has now been suspended. According to reports earlier this week the average time ships spent in canal waters was 42 hours this Monday, compare dot last year's average of 24.5 hours last year.
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Pilot slowdown jams Panama Canal traffic

Canal Daily OperationToronto Star - A work slowdown by pilots who guide ships through the Panama Canal is causing unprecedented delays and creating a costly bottleneck for shipping companies, canal employees and shippers say. Some 250 Panama Canal pilots, who take charge of all vessels while they travel between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, want a pay raise and formal work contracts, and are protesting by giving only limited help to clear gridlocks in the busy trade route. With around 5 per cent of global trade passing through Panama, scores of vessels laden with containers are stretching out off the coast of Panama City, waiting to enter the canal. The average time ships spent in canal waters stood at 42 hours early this week, compared with an average of 24.5 hours last year. The delays are costing shippers tens of thousands of dollars per day.
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