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Thursday, September 20 2018 @ 09:34 AM UTC

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Boats Busted for Fishing in the Bay of Panama

Fishing The Panamanian National Maritime Service (SMN) impounded two fishing boats, the Tabor and the Andrea M. for fishing in a prohibited zone in the Bay of Panama. The SMN Pacific Service inspected the boats and found the boats did not have either a crew listing or fishing permits. Both fishing boats are owned by Promarina, based out of Puerto Caimito in La Chorrera. The case was handed over to the National Maritime Authority (AMN) that will investigate both boats to determine responsibilities. Fishing is prohibited in the area between Flamenco Island and the mouth of the Tapia river. In addition, the capital municipality prohibits the fishing in the bay of Panama. According to the law, the Promarina company can be fined $1,000 and the boats captains licenses will be cancelled. The boats will remain under the control of the SMN until the AMP finishes their investigations. All crew members were released.
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LOWLANDS: Return visit gives deeper look at canal's ties to nature, culture

Fishing By Lynn Ferrin: Gatun Lake, Panama -- A terrible, hoarse roar echoed through the forest. Howler monkeys. In a large tree hanging over the water, a dozen of them leapt up from their naps, fidgeted through the branches and glared down at us. We peered back and added them to our list of jungle spottings for the day: red-naped tamarins and white-faced capuchins, three-toed sloths, wattled jacanas and a 50,000-ton, blue-and-orange container ship. Not the usual fare in most deep-jungle nature preserves, but in Panama, where the world's best-known waterway slices through miles of primeval rain forest, economy and ecology are irrevocably intertwined. The result is pristine rain forest teeming with wildlife that is both protected and accessible because without it, one of the world's grandest engineering projects and one of its busiest waterways could not function.
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Law Protecting Coiba Will Not be Modified

Fishing Milciades Concepción, who is a member of Panama's National Assembly and the President of the Assembly's Commission on the environment says that Law 44 of 26 July 2004 which created the Coiba National Park will not be modified. According to Concepción to date the National Assembly has not received any proposals to reform the law protecting the waters around Coiba, and if any such proposals were submitted it would not have the support of members of the Assembly. Concepción made his statements a day after the President of the Barú Free Zone (ZFB http://www.zonafrancadebaru.com/) located in Puerto Armuelles in Chiríqui, Karim Gozaine, said that they law would have to be modified in order for tuna fishing companies in the area to develop. Gozaine said that two companies, the Factory of Tuna Exquisiteces (Fextun) and Granjas Atuneras de Panamá S.A., have not started operations yet due to restrictions included in Law 44. "The only way for the fishing industry to develop is by changing the law, but I recognize that it would be very difficult because of opposition on the part of ecologists", added Gozaine.
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The Fish Market Will be Closed on Monday (Cleaning)

Fishing The fish market in Panama City will be closed this coming Monday for a regularly scheduled deep-cleaning. The fish market is managed or under the administration of the Mayor's office of Panama City, and every month or so they shut the place down, make all of the vendors remove everything from their stalls, and steam-cleam everything as a preventative measure. For more on the fish market, check out: http://www.panama-guide.com/article.php?story=20050424204255292
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Balboa Yacht Club on Amador in Panama City

FishingOnce upon a time there was a huge wooden building standing right next to the Panama Canal, a well-known landmark to boaters from around the world. The Balboa Yacht Club was a place where you could find line-handlers to get through the canal, find a mechanic to get something fixed, anchor your boat and get a bite to eat, and served as the entry point to the country of Panama for many people for years. The "old" wooden building of the Balboa Yacht Club was destroyed in a fire, but the pier, anchorage, and boat repair facilities still exist. Back in the old days, the "Yacht Club" was a favorite watering hole in the Canal Zone, and I used to love watching the boats going through the canal and the cars going over the Bridge of the Americas with a Soberana in one hand and some ceviche in the other. I've got a good hunch that the "BYC" will be making a comeback...
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Panama Baywatch?

FishingYou know, I'm starting to like this whole "clean up the bay" thing. Since the work has not started yet, does anyone know of a company that does water testing in Panama City? I'm thinking about doing some kind of a "before" and "after" study, to establish a baseline of just how nasty the bay is right now, and to be able to see tangible differences once the construction is complete. Like, how long will the bay take to "flush itself out" once the runoff and sewage systems are installed and operating? What are the acceptible levels of bacteria and other stuff found at some of the most popular swimming beaches in the US and around the world (comapred to what's in the bay now)? Sooner or later there will be jet-ski rentals, recreational sailing, swimming beaches, fishing, and that kind of stuff right here off of Balboa Avenue. The question is - just now clean does the bay have to be, before it's safe to use? And, who's going to give the green light. Maybe we should start thinking about lifeguards...
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About 76 tons of Seafood Sold during Holy Week

Fishing Approximately 8,000 people bought seafood at the Seafood Market on Balboa Avenue during Holy Week, according to a report from the Mayor's office released yesterday. Vendors sold about 76 tons of seafood for approximately $360,000 in total sales. (Editor's Comment: In Panama, Catholics traditionally eat less red meat and more seafood during holy week celebrations, and what's going on at the seafood market is always a topic of discussion.)
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Aquaculture Will See $50 million from Outside Investment

Fishing Panama has been recognized over the years as a good place to invest. But some sectors are just starting to take off. Such is the case in the aquaculture sector whose exports have maintained a noticeable growth in comparison with other products, but so far has been limited to experimental products. There are actually 188 bodies of water in Panama, and people fish in most of them. Some 5,000 people make their living in Panama from fishing. The marine potential in Panama is being recognized by important foreign companies that intend to establish ambitious projects at a national level. Reinaldo Morales, national assistant director of Aquaculture, said the sector will receive more than $50 million dollars of outside investment his year, in projects located specifically along Panama's Caribbean coast. Companies from Latin America, the United States and Asia want to establish commercial projects directed towards taking advantage of the conditions offered in Panama, such as water resources, geographic position, processing plants, ports and shipping facilities, etc.
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Dead Whale Found in Bay of Panama

FishingHéctor Guzmán, marine biologist of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), and members of his team took samples yesterday afternoon samples from a whale floating dead in the Pacific ocean some four miles offshore. The Gulf of Panama is frequently visited at this time of the year by whales, but they still don't know what kind of whale this was. The dead whale was more than 16 meters long. The STRI investigators have not yet etermined the cause of death.
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Coral bleachings haunt the world's reefs

Fishing By Michael Perry Sydney - When marine scientist Ray Berkelmans went diving at Australia's Great Barrier Reef earlier this year, what he discovered shocked him - a graveyard of coral stretching as far as he could see. "It's a white desert out there," Berkelmans said in early March after returning from a dive to survey bleaching - signs of a mass death of corals caused by a sudden rise in ocean temperatures - around the Keppel Islands. Australia has just experienced its warmest year on record and abnormally high sea temperatures during summer have caused massive coral bleaching in the Keppels. Sea temperatures touched 29°Celsius, the upper limit for coral. '95 to 98 percent of the coral is bleached in the Keppels' High temperatures are also a condition for the formation of hurricanes, such as Katrina which hit New Orleans in 2005.
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