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Panama Guide

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Thursday, July 31 2014 @ 09:40 PM EDT

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Panama on the Edge of its Next Growth Spurt

Travel & Tourism (Jaxfax.com) - Famous for a canal, a hat that is actually made in another country and a military leader with a pock-marked face, Panama forms a slither of land that weaves North America to Mexico to Central and finally, South America. The Canal is indisputably one of the wonders of the modern world, but it does not quite belong to the Panamanians, its hats are made in Ecuador, and Manuel Noriega was sentenced to 40 years in a federal prison in 1992, making this country seem like an odd fit even in its own region. Its two coasts—the Pacific and the Caribbean— have breathtaking beaches and diving opportunities to match. Panama City, was the first Spanish settlement on the Pacific, founded in 1519, when it was a fishing village. Within a 100 years, its commercial importance attracted the English who destroyed it and the city was moved to Casco Antiguo, home to a handful of colonial structures.
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Travel Home Business: Panama Considered Central America's Most Sought After New Tourism Destination

Travel & Tourism January 23, 2007 ( Miami, FL ) ---New and tell-all website, The Panama Report, reveals that hunting with century-old indian tribes, spelunking through mysterious jungle caves, and exploring secluded Caribbean islands isn't just reserved for Hollywood anymore. With its teeming rainforests, hidden beaches, and rich history and culture, the tiny isthmus that was once only known for a Canal, is now making sound waves as perhaps the most authentic travel destination in Central America. Features in the New York Times and Miami Herald, as well as recent articles in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, have spurred more and more visitors to Panama, the crossroads of the Americas . In the midst of this tourism and real estate boom, bona fide websites like thepanamareport.com are revealing the good, the bad, and the ugly sides a Panama vacation. Panama's high safety rating, tropical climate, and retirement incentives are drawing more and more baby boomers from the States everyday. Condos in cosmopolitan Panama City overlooking the Pacific Ocean for $200,000? Beach houses within walking distance from white sand beaches, $110,000? Giant tracts of oceanfront land selling at $0.25 per square meter? They sound too good to be true, but thanks to Panama's low cost of living and still relatively young real estate sector, anyone can get a piece of the action. Pair the amazing Panama investment with the Costa Rica allure of secret waterfalls, uninhabited beaches, and spectacular wildlife to see why the growth in Panama in 2006 was bigger than any country in the region.
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Ruben Blades, Copa tout Panama in the Dominican capital

Travel & Tourism Santo Domingo - Panama's Tourism Institute, whose director is the salsa great Ruben Blades, jointly with the Panamanian Carnival Board and Copa Airlines, presented to a select group of travel agents, major tour operators and the media, an innovative vacation option in the Central American country: The Panamanian Carnival. “This new offer seeks to divulge at an international level, one of the most prominent cultural traditions in Panama. We offer attractive travel deals, with an open invitation for Dominicans to come visit us before, during and after our Carnival,” said Tourism minister Blades. Blades is a renowned Salsa singer, TV and film actor, and is known for his popular number “Pedro Navaja,” in which he recounts the low life in the country’s slums. Blades said that his country’s tourism activity centers on cultural awareness and cultivation, and that these days visitors want to access different places to experience other living styles, and not necessarily just to relax or for fun. He affirmed that, during his tenure, Tourism in Panama makes hefty contributions to his country’s gross domestic product (GDP). Also present were Panamanian ambassador in the Dominican Republic, Miroslava Rosas and Minghtoy Giro, president of the Panamanian Carnival Board, who described the upcoming event for the media, to take place fm the 16th to the 20th of February 2007.
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Exotic destinations are the hot ticket for 2007 travel

Travel & Tourism By MACKENZIE CARPENTER for the BLOCK NEWS ALLIANCE - So where will it be in 2007? You’ve hiked volcanoes in Nicaragua, browsed in Krakow’s medieval-era markets, dined alfresco in Dubrovnik, and cruised along Turkey’s gorgeous Mediterranean coast, so what in the world is out there that is new and exciting for the adventurous traveler? For Cindy Carbine of Highland Park. Pa., it will be a Caribbean cruise — but not just any cruise. She’s headed to Panama, and will spend a day river kayaking there. And Marsha Berger, of Squirrel Hill, Pa., dreams of exploring Ethiopia’s rock-carved churches, if war doesn’t overtake that country. Whether you’re on a budget or are a luxury-loving pleasure seeker, there are still travel destinations on this shrinking planet that can easily fit under the category of “new,” not to mention “hot.” Frommer’s annual “Top 12” list for this year includes affordable domestic destinations such as Asheville, N.C., nestled in the Blue Ridge mountains, and Minneapolis — which has cold winter weather but fabulous architecture, food, and cultural attractions — as well as Panama and Ethiopia. Other travel experts cite Eastern Europe, especially Poland; the exquisite city of Antwerp in Belgium; Buenos Aires, and Argentina’s wine region, Mendoza; Cambodia’s fabled Angkor Wat ruins; Northern Ireland, and on and on. (more)
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Where We Want To Go In 2007

Travel & Tourism By Sophia Banay for Forbes - Here's a resolution you won't mind making: Travel better this year. And we don't just mean buy trip insurance and pack your toothbrush. Instead of resorting to the same, time-worn vacation spots, resolve to make 2007 a year you'll remember because you visited a tropical butterfly park in Honduras, went hot air ballooning over Namibian sand dunes or got a two-hour marine mud massage at North Island resort in the Seychelles--not because you stayed with Gramps in Palm Beach again. According to the Washington-based Travel Industry Association of America, the international travel and tourism industry experienced strong growth in 2006, and additional expansion of 4.6% per year is expected over the next 10 years. Thanks to a stable economy, steady wage increases and the lack of any major recent terrorist attacks in popular vacation spots, Americans in particular have indulged their wanderlust. And in 2007, industry experts say the most popular trips will have one thing in common. "The emphasis really is on experiential travel," says Misty Ewing, the director of public relations at Texas-based Virtuoso, a luxury travel network. "People are looking for more authentic experiences and ways to immerse themselves in local cultures. Now, I think that when people go on vacation, they really want to learn and know the destinations they're visiting. They want to experience it to its fullest extent."
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35th Annual Boquete Flower and Coffee Fair Opens Today

Travel & Tourism By Sandra Alicia Rivera for La Prensa - The 2007 Panamanian National Fair Season starts today with the inauguration of one of most colorful and aromatic, the 35th Annual Boquete Flower and Coffee Fair. Organizers of this event say that the wonderful flowers and smells make this event different than any of the other 21 fairs that are held in the different provinces throughout the country. Edilberto Beitía, president of organization, said that this year the gardeners will not dissapoint the visitors who will be attending the fair between 11 - 21 January, and at least 35,000 flowers will be exhibited, featuring orquids frm Australia, Japan, the United States, Costa Rica and, of course those native to Panama. Putting this fair together takes the entire year. As soon as the 2006 fair finished gardeners began to prepare the ground for seeds and transplants for this year's fair. This early preparation ensures that all of the plants will be in full bloom for the festival. During the year the also take inventory of their stock and contact foreign companies that distribute the plants to them to place new seed orders. Each year they spend more than $90,000 on seeds and plants. The fair features 47 gardens - among them two specializing in orchquids, that occupy a total of three hectares and that under the constant care of ten people. (more)
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Although overlooked, music and culture run deep in Panama

Travel & Tourism By Agustin Gurza for the Los Angeles Times - PANAMA CITY, Panama: Panama has always been a convenient shortcut for travelers on their way somewhere else. The Spaniards used it to haul treasures from Peru. Prospectors used it to race by rail to California for the Gold Rush. And the whole world still uses its canal, the fastest way to move cargo and cruise ships between oceans. Poor Panama. Always a detour, never a destination. But I didn't come here earlier this year to cross the canal or even to look at its locks. I came to explore something that has been as overlooked as the country itself: its music and culture. My guide to this largely undiscovered world was Ruben Blades, Panama's most celebrated pop-culture figure. The acclaimed salsa singer and songwriter, who ran unsuccessfully for president here in 1994, now serves as minister of tourism, a job that, like his songs, he has undertaken with creative spirit and a sense of social purpose. Today, he may be the country's second-most recognizable name — after Gen. Manuel Noriega. But Blades bristles when reporters ask him about the dictator whom U.S. forces ousted during a military invasion almost 17 years ago. Time to look at Panama in a different light, Blades says.
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The Start of Holiday Season in Panama

Travel & Tourism Tomorrow, the 3rd of November, Panama starts a celebration that keeps going for about three full months. Between now and March sometimes it seems like there are more holidays than work days. The party starts with the "Day of the Child" on 1 November, the "Day of the Deceased" on 2 November, Independence Day (from Colombia) on 3 November, the "Anniversary of the First Call for Independence" on 10 November, Independence Day (from Spain) on 28 November, Mother's Day on 8 December, Christmas, New Years, Three King's Day on 6 January, Martyr's Day on 9 January, and Carnival. The "party season" ends on Ash Wednesday which happens to fall on February 21, 2007 this time around. That means that carnival will be from Friday 16 February through Tuesday, the 20th of February. And then the following month there's Holy week. In any case, that's the schedule and if you need to get anything done you should consider the holiday season in your plans. For example right now you won't be able to get anything done until at least Tuesday of next week. And, the city is getting more and more empty with every passing minute as people grab their boogie boards and head for the beach. Be careful out there because there are always a spike in traffic accidents due to the migration to and from. Have a happy Independence Day.
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Window On Panama

Travel & Tourism (Source) Agustin Gurza for the Los Angeles Times: PANAMA CITY, PANAMA In contrast to the city's old quarter, modern Panama City emerges from the tranquil bay, seen through one of the arches of the Church of Saint Francis of Assisi, located in Casco Antiguo. Panama has always been a convenient shortcut for travellers on their way somewhere else. The Spaniards used it to haul treasures from Peru. Prospectors used it to race by rail to California for the Gold Rush. And the whole world still uses its canal, the fastest way to move cargo and cruise ships between oceans. Poor Panama. Always a detour, never a destination. But I didn't come here earlier this year to cross the canal or even to look at its locks. I came to explore something that has been as overlooked as the country itself: its music and culture. My guide to this largely undiscovered world was Ruben Blades, Panama's most celebrated pop-culture figure. The acclaimed salsa singer and songwriter, who ran unsuccessfully for president here in 1994, now serves as minister of tourism, a job that, like his songs, he has undertaken with creative spirit and a sense of social purpose. (more)
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Panama - The Path Less Traveled

Travel & TourismPanama's Tourism Institute (IPAT) produced this video promoting Panama as the Path Less Traveled. Nice...

Rosetta Stone Language Software

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